Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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John V55
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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Wendy1969 wrote: 25 Nov 2023, 13:03 I like the idea of online teaching as well as online learning.In fact I still constantly look up various English words on the internet.
But, I think it, like onsite teaching, should only be considered for more mature students who genuinely enjoy learning English language or for students have real interest in improving their English language skills. It would only be a waste of time if one has to put so much effort to teach and only to find out that, e.g. they have intentions to replace our English language with their alien Chinese language in the future.
Chinese is becoming more popular in the East, not surprisingly considering its proximity. Yet, having said that English is still the business language of the world and is a necessity. I taught in China for several years and it’s a fantastic place. Nothing like it’s portrayed as in the western media.

Teaching online is a scam and you won’t make any reasonable amount of money from it. The company will take most of the profit and you will do the work. Not many in a developing country can afford the cost of private (online) education.
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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John V55 wrote: 04 Dec 2023, 09:50
Wendy1969 wrote: 25 Nov 2023, 13:03 I like the idea of online teaching as well as online learning.In fact I still constantly look up various English words on the internet.
But, I think it, like onsite teaching, should only be considered for more mature students who genuinely enjoy learning English language or for students have real interest in improving their English language skills. It would only be a waste of time if one has to put so much effort to teach and only to find out that, e.g. they have intentions to replace our English language with their alien Chinese language in the future.
Chinese is becoming more popular in the East, not surprisingly considering its proximity. Yet, having said that English is still the business language of the world and is a necessity. I taught in China for several years and it’s a fantastic place. Nothing like it’s portrayed as in the western media.

Teaching online is a scam and you won’t make any reasonable amount of money from it. The company will take most of the profit and you will do the work. Not many in a developing country can afford the cost of private (online) education.
Chinese is deviously pushing their rude culture/ language to us even though English is much more important and much more useful in our everyday life. I think they should not push their Chinese language/culture to us who don’t like it.

Many of them exploited the popularity of English language solely for financial gain. Many of them have little regard for high standards. Anyway, they think their Chinese language/culture is ‘superior’ even though it is not.
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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There is a lot of truth about the many unpleasant aspects of their often harsh Chinese culture.
Perhaps, you find it fantastic because you did not end up as their victim.
I still prefer the much more civilised Western culture that is not infected by Chinese/Asian culture.
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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Wendy1969 wrote: 04 Dec 2023, 10:38 There is a lot of truth about the many unpleasant aspects of their often harsh Chinese culture.
Perhaps, you find it fantastic because you did not end up as their victim.
I still prefer the much more civilised Western culture that is not infected by Chinese/Asian culture.
Ever society has its drawbacks. I didn’t end up as a victim because I played by the rules and I think the vast majority that come unstuck didn’t. I also think you’ll find that under multiculturalism there isn’t much left of western culture. I suppose it comes down to whether you prefer a traditional society such as Asia, or the chaos of the west. I certainly wouldn’t want to teach in a British school.
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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John V55 wrote: 31 Dec 2023, 17:32
Wendy1969 wrote: 04 Dec 2023, 10:38 There is a lot of truth about the many unpleasant aspects of their often harsh Chinese culture.
Perhaps, you find it fantastic because you did not end up as their victim.
I still prefer the much more civilised Western culture that is not infected by Chinese/Asian culture.
Ever society has its drawbacks. I didn’t end up as a victim because I played by the rules and I think the vast majority that come unstuck didn’t. I also think you’ll find that under multiculturalism there isn’t much left of western culture. I suppose it comes down to whether you prefer a traditional society such as Asia, or the chaos of the west. I certainly wouldn’t want to teach in a British school.
I have to disagree with you. Chinese/Asian culture in reality can often be very deceptive and often unfair even to the most hardworking teacher with lots of potential like myself. Many of the Chinese (principals/students) that I encountered were very Chinese and they were extremely chaotic, abusive, intimidating, oppressive… It is certainly not a society that I want to be part of if given a choice.
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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Wendy1969 wrote: 31 Dec 2023, 21:27
John V55 wrote: 31 Dec 2023, 17:32
Wendy1969 wrote: 04 Dec 2023, 10:38 There is a lot of truth about the many unpleasant aspects of their often harsh Chinese culture.
Perhaps, you find it fantastic because you did not end up as their victim.
I still prefer the much more civilised Western culture that is not infected by Chinese/Asian culture.
Ever society has its drawbacks. I didn’t end up as a victim because I played by the rules and I think the vast majority that come unstuck didn’t. I also think you’ll find that under multiculturalism there isn’t much left of western culture. I suppose it comes down to whether you prefer a traditional society such as Asia, or the chaos of the west. I certainly wouldn’t want to teach in a British school.
I have to disagree with you. Chinese/Asian culture in reality can often be very deceptive and often unfair even to the most hardworking teacher with lots of potential like myself. Many of the Chinese (principals/students) that I encountered were very Chinese and they were extremely chaotic, abusive, intimidating, oppressive… It is certainly not a society that I want to be part of if given a choice.
Also, in addition, Asian/Chinese societies very often tend to show their nasty colours to us who may be disadvantaged in one way or another. I was struggling in their hostile infested environment to earn pittance and their exploitive, horrible Chinese/Asian culture/society made it worse for me in every way. It is extremely difficult to start a new independent life in a place dominated or infested by multiculturalism(eg alien culture such as their chinese tendencies of favouring their own) if one is disadvantaged.

That is another reason why I still prefer the many decent aspects of our Western culture.
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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Wendy1969 wrote: 31 Dec 2023, 22:09
Wendy1969 wrote: 31 Dec 2023, 21:27
John V55 wrote: 31 Dec 2023, 17:32
Ever society has its drawbacks. I didn’t end up as a victim because I played by the rules and I think the vast majority that come unstuck didn’t. I also think you’ll find that under multiculturalism there isn’t much left of western culture. I suppose it comes down to whether you prefer a traditional society such as Asia, or the chaos of the west. I certainly wouldn’t want to teach in a British school.
I have to disagree with you. Chinese/Asian culture in reality can often be very deceptive and often unfair even to the most hardworking teacher with lots of potential like myself. Many of the Chinese (principals/students) that I encountered were very Chinese and they were extremely chaotic, abusive, intimidating, oppressive… It is certainly not a society that I want to be part of if given a choice.
Also, in addition, Asian/Chinese societies very often tend to show their nasty colours to us who may be disadvantaged in one way or another. I was struggling in their hostile infested environment to earn pittance and their exploitive, horrible Chinese/Asian culture/society made it worse for me in every way. It is extremely difficult to start a new independent life in a place dominated or infested by multiculturalism(eg alien culture such as their chinese tendencies of favouring their own) if one is disadvantaged.

That is another reason why I still prefer the many decent aspects of our Western culture.
Too many parts of Asia together with their often oppressive, harsh, brutal culture is often even much more chaotic and much more ugly than our much more civilised Western culture that tend to give a fair go to anyone. That is another reason why I don’t like Asia and their often deceptive Asian/Chinese culture.
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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By the way, New Year Greetings to John VSS and everyone here who may be browsing this forum.
I hope the year 2024 will be a better year for everyone.
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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Wendy1969 wrote: 01 Jan 2024, 08:36 By the way, New Year Greetings to John VSS and everyone here who may be browsing this forum.
I hope the year 2024 will be a better year for everyone.
And a Happy New Year to you also. :)
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

Unread post by eggshell »

Thanks for the detailed perspective on online teaching. It definitely seems like the reality isn't as rosy as some of the marketing makes it out to be. It's good that you're pushing back on overly optimistic portrayals to help manage expectations. Working abroad still seems like a better option if someone truly wants to make a career out of teaching. Thanks for the food for thought - hope you have a great start to the new year!
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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eggshell wrote: 05 Jan 2024, 09:47 Thanks for the detailed perspective on online teaching. It definitely seems like the reality isn't as rosy as some of the marketing makes it out to be. It's good that you're pushing back on overly optimistic portrayals to help manage expectations. Working abroad still seems like a better option if someone truly wants to make a career out of teaching. Thanks for the food for thought - hope you have a great start to the new year!
I do have my own reservation for online teaching and I do think it may be only suitable for learners/teachers who live are living remotely. Besides, one also needs a reliable computer/internet connection. Otherwise, face to face learning/teaching tend to be a better option.
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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Thanks for shedding light on the online teaching gig. Your take on the pay and the practicalities (or lack thereof) of teaching a full syllabus through a phone really puts things into perspective. It's eye-opening to see how it's more about chatting than true teaching. Makes me rethink jumping into it expecting easy money. Sounds like standing in front of a class, in person, is where the real teaching happens.
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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Online teaching isn't the quick cash solution some might think it is. You've made a good point about the work involved versus what you actually earn. It sounds pretty unsustainable. While on a different note, checking out BrainStation reviews could shed light on how other online education platforms handle these challenges. It's interesting to think about how traditional teaching methods translate online – it's definitely more than just having a chat.
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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I think one should not confuse online teaching with online learning - where it is more like self-directed learning, where one do one’s independent study/research via online at one’s own time, with or without further guidance from teachers/tutors or institution of higher learning.

Also, many courses nowadays have online teaching done via recorded videos or podcast. It is certainly very different from live online teaching where students and teachers have to be connected via webcam on a scheduled time.
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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John V55 wrote: 31 Dec 2023, 17:32
Wendy1969 wrote: 04 Dec 2023, 10:38 There is a lot of truth about the many unpleasant aspects of their often harsh Chinese culture.
Perhaps, you find it fantastic because you did not end up as their victim.
I still prefer the much more civilised Western culture that is not infected by Chinese/Asian culture.
Ever society has its drawbacks. I didn’t end up as a victim because I played by the rules and I think the vast majority that come unstuck didn’t. I also think you’ll find that under multiculturalism there isn’t much left of western culture. I suppose it comes down to whether you prefer a traditional society such as Asia, or the chaos of the west. I certainly wouldn’t want to teach in a British school.
I decided to come back to your comment on this rather interesting issue - multiculturalism versus western culture, which I think needs further clarification.

Nowadays, with so many cultures vying for dominance, it can be chaotic, though I still prefer mainly western culture.

I would still prefer to teach in a British/American/International standard school if there is opportunity.
And, again, no I don’t prefer a traditional Asian society such as one commonly found in various parts of Asia even though I am living in Asia right now. I find it to be to be too stifling. And besides, they are more into Asian culture, which can be very oppressive.
Indeed, every society has its own drawbacks. It is not whether one played by their rules or not. It is more like how likely they would mistreat you if they have the upper hand over you. It can be tricky and at best of times - tolerable.
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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I think the saying, when in Rome applies. We are products of our culture and I too prefer my own, but under multiculturalism I preferred Asian conservatism over extreme western liberalism.

No culture is perfect and the bureaucracy of Asia and China often drove me mad, but it is what it is. I prefer state schools to private ones which is where you’ll be mistreated because they’re businesses and every business is profit motivated, so that’s no surprise. Apart from the odd hiccup, I can say I enjoyed my time in Asia. Now retired and having been back in Britain for a few years I can’t say I’m overawed at the state school system here and if I was younger I'd be heading straight back to China.
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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John V55 wrote: 18 Mar 2024, 07:08 I think the saying, when in Rome applies. We are products of our culture and I too prefer my own, but under multiculturalism I preferred Asian conservatism over extreme western liberalism.

No culture is perfect and the bureaucracy of Asia and China often drove me mad, but it is what it is. I prefer state schools to private ones which is where you’ll be mistreated because they’re businesses and every business is profit motivated, so that’s no surprise. Apart from the odd hiccup, I can say I enjoyed my time in Asia. Now retired and having been back in Britain for a few years I can’t say I’m overawed at the state school system here and if I was younger I'd be heading straight back to China.
Thank you for sharing your opinion.

However, I think Western culture still much more tolerant in most aspects of our lives. That being said, I have to say Western culture is not perfect either. Asian culture tend to be much more restrictive and much more intolerant.

As regard how liberal Western countries need to be in order to strike a nice balance for everyone concerned, it may depends on how one sees it.

As with regard state schools versus private schools, it is another matter that need further research with regard it effectiveness and benefits.
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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Wendy1969 wrote: 18 Mar 2024, 07:21
John V55 wrote: 18 Mar 2024, 07:08 I think the saying, when in Rome applies. We are products of our culture and I too prefer my own, but under multiculturalism I preferred Asian conservatism over extreme western liberalism.

No culture is perfect and the bureaucracy of Asia and China often drove me mad, but it is what it is. I prefer state schools to private ones which is where you’ll be mistreated because they’re businesses and every business is profit motivated, so that’s no surprise. Apart from the odd hiccup, I can say I enjoyed my time in Asia. Now retired and having been back in Britain for a few years I can’t say I’m overawed at the state school system here and if I was younger I'd be heading straight back to China.
Thank you for sharing your opinion.

(1)However, I think Western culture still much more tolerant in most aspects of our lives. (2)That being said, I have to say Western culture is not perfect either. (3)Asian culture tend to be much more restrictive and much more intolerant.

(4)As regard how liberal Western countries need to be in order to strike a nice balance for everyone concerned, it may depends on how one sees it.

(5)As with regard state schools versus private schools, it is another matter that need further research with regard it effectiveness and benefits.
Further to my reply to you, I think I need to make a few corrections on my sentences -that I have preceded with a number - for references purposes.

Sentence (1) - There was an omission of auxiliary verb ‘is’ after the word culture.

Sentence (2) - No grammar or typing error.

Sentence (3) - No grammar or typing error.

Sentence (4) - No grammar or typing error.

Sentence (5) - It should be ‘its’ before the word effectiveness.

I wish to add here that Western culture on its own, tend to be much better and less chaotic as
compared to some diluted Western culture that is already mixed with other cultures.


Also, English language is still very much part of Western culture even though it has become part of other cultures as well. English language has improved many aspects of our lives, has continued to benefit other cultures as well and allowed other cultures to communicate to a wider world though it does make our modern lives much more complicated.
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

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Wendy1969 wrote: 18 Mar 2024, 12:57
Wendy1969 wrote: 18 Mar 2024, 07:21
John V55 wrote: 18 Mar 2024, 07:08 I think the saying, when in Rome applies. We are products of our culture and I too prefer my own, but under multiculturalism I preferred Asian conservatism over extreme western liberalism.

No culture is perfect and the bureaucracy of Asia and China often drove me mad, but it is what it is. I prefer state schools to private ones which is where you’ll be mistreated because they’re businesses and every business is profit motivated, so that’s no surprise. Apart from the odd hiccup, I can say I enjoyed my time in Asia. Now retired and having been back in Britain for a few years I can’t say I’m overawed at the state school system here and if I was younger I'd be heading straight back to China.
Thank you for sharing your opinion.

(1)However, I think Western culture still much more tolerant in most aspects of our lives. (2)That being said, I have to say Western culture is not perfect either. (3)Asian culture tend to be much more restrictive and much more intolerant.

(4)As regard how liberal Western countries need to be in order to strike a nice balance for everyone concerned, it may depends on how one sees it.

(5)As with regard state schools versus private schools, it is another matter that need further research with regard it effectiveness and benefits.
Further to my reply to you, I think I need to make a few corrections on my sentences -that I have preceded with a number - for references purposes.

Sentence (1) - There was an omission of auxiliary verb ‘is’ after the word culture.

Sentence (2) - No grammar or typing error.

Sentence (3) - No grammar or typing error.

Sentence (4) - No grammar or typing error.

Sentence (5) - It should be ‘its’ before the word effectiveness.

I wish to add here that Western culture on its own, tend to be much better and less chaotic as
compared to some diluted Western culture that is already mixed with other cultures.


Also, English language is still very much part of Western culture even though it has become part of other cultures as well. English language has improved many aspects of our lives, has continued to benefit other cultures as well and allowed other cultures to communicate to a wider world though it does make our modern lives much more complicated.
Further corrections:
I wish to add here that Western culture on its own, tend to be much better and less chaotic as
compared to some diluted Western culture that is already mixed with other cultures.

Unwanted comma
Tend should be tends
Cultures (plural) There is more than one western culture.
Why worry unless you’re specifically teaching grammar.
English is important because it’s the business language of the world. It really is as simple as that. :)
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Re: Online teaching: The fallacy of making a quick buck

Unread post by Wendy1969 »

John V55 wrote: 27 Mar 2024, 20:19
Wendy1969 wrote: 18 Mar 2024, 12:57
Wendy1969 wrote: 18 Mar 2024, 07:21

Thank you for sharing your opinion.

(1)However, I think Western culture still much more tolerant in most aspects of our lives. (2)That being said, I have to say Western culture is not perfect either. (3)Asian culture tend to be much more restrictive and much more intolerant.

(4)As regard how liberal Western countries need to be in order to strike a nice balance for everyone concerned, it may depends on how one sees it.

(5)As with regard state schools versus private schools, it is another matter that need further research with regard it effectiveness and benefits.
Further to my reply to you, I think I need to make a few corrections on my sentences -that I have preceded with a number - for references purposes.

Sentence (1) - There was an omission of auxiliary verb ‘is’ after the word culture.

Sentence (2) - No grammar or typing error.

Sentence (3) - No grammar or typing error.

Sentence (4) - No grammar or typing error.

Sentence (5) - It should be ‘its’ before the word effectiveness.

I wish to add here that Western culture on its own, tend to be much better and less chaotic as
compared to some diluted Western culture that is already mixed with other cultures.


Also, English language is still very much part of Western culture even though it has become part of other cultures as well. English language has improved many aspects of our lives, has continued to benefit other cultures as well and allowed other cultures to communicate to a wider world though it does make our modern lives much more complicated.
Further corrections:
I wish to add here that Western culture on its own, tend to be much better and less chaotic as
compared to some diluted Western culture that is already mixed with other cultures.

Unwanted comma
Tend should be tends
Cultures (plural) There is more than one western culture.
Why worry unless you’re specifically teaching grammar.
English is important because it’s the business language of the world. It really is as simple as that. :)
Thank you for the corrections and I do agree with your corrections.

Grammar rules as well as my own typos and other typos (that one sees quite commonly in non-native English speaking places) can drive me bonkers at times but I will continue to work on it till I achieve near perfection.

I wish to add that English is also important because one can teach as well as learn many interesting subjects via English language.

Not surprisingly, it has become the world’s most popular and most interesting lingua franca.

English language, when used correctly and using the righ native approach, enable everyone the opportunities to expand on one’s horizons.
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