Freelancer rate - teaching company staff

Discussion on teaching Business English

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Almanac@
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Posts: 1
Joined: 26 Aug 2019, 13:10
Status: Teacher

Freelancer rate - teaching company staff

Unread post by Almanac@ »

Hi

After a break from ESL, I've returned with a plan to teach 2x 1 hour lessons (weekly) to company staff very soon and I wondered if any other freelancers out there could help give a benchmark of what I should be charging a corporate? I've only taught in-company via an agency before.

Both groups will be between 5-10 people.
swernaa2
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Posts: 4
Joined: 23 Sep 2023, 09:13
Status: Teacher

Re: Freelancer rate - teaching company staff

Unread post by swernaa2 »

If you have specialized qualifications or certifications related to ESL teaching (e.g., TESOL, CELTA), you may be able to charge a premium for your services. Rates can vary significantly by location. In some regions or cities, the cost of living may be higher, allowing for higher teaching rates. Teaching larger groups can be more challenging and time-consuming, so you may charge more for larger classes compared to smaller ones. Consider whether you're providing ongoing weekly lessons or short-term courses. Longer or more frequent engagements may justify a lower rate.

It's essential to strike a balance between setting a rate that reflects your expertise and the market's expectations while also being competitive and attractive to potential clients. You may also want to consult with other freelance ESL teachers in your area to get a sense of the prevailing rates.
swernaa2
Member
Posts: 4
Joined: 23 Sep 2023, 09:13
Status: Teacher

Re: Freelancer rate - teaching company staff

Unread post by swernaa2 »

swernaa2 wrote: 23 Sep 2023, 09:17 If you have specialized qualifications or certifications related to ESL teaching (e.g., TESOL, CELTA), you may be able to charge a premium for your services. Rates can vary significantly by location. In some regions or cities, the cost of living may be higher, allowing for higher teaching rates. Teaching larger groups can be more challenging and time-consuming, so you may charge more for larger classes compared to smaller ones. Consider whether you're providing ongoing weekly lessons or short-term courses. Longer or more frequent engagements may justify a lower rate.

It's essential to strike a balance between setting a rate that reflects your expertise and the market's expectations while also being competitive and attractive to potential clients. You may also want to consult with other freelance ESL teachers in your area to get a sense of the prevailing rates.
Look at what other freelance ESL tutors in your area charge for corporate lessons. Check online job boards, forums, or ask fellow freelancers for insights. MyAARPMedicare Sign In Assess the company's specific requirements, such as the number of students, the frequency and duration of lessons, and any specialized topics or skills needed.
BillyH
Rising Star
Posts: 38
Joined: 10 Apr 2024, 07:55
Status: Teacher

Re: This thread is gay

Unread post by BillyH »

Hey there,

So, you're back in the ESL game, ready to conquer the corporate world with your linguistic prowess? Excellent! Let's dive into the murky waters of pricing, where the BS flows freely and the rates are as elusive as a unicorn in the desert.

Imagine this: You're a seasoned ESL wizard, with more tricks up your sleeve than a magician at a kid's birthday party. Your resume boasts of teaching English to aliens on Mars (well, almost), and your students have gone from "Lost in Translation" to "Shakespearean Prodigy" in record time.

Now, let's talk numbers. How much should you charge these corporate bigwigs for your linguistic wizardry? Picture this scenario:

Example BS #1: The Executive Immersion Experience

You stroll into the boardroom like a boss, armed with your arsenal of English prowess. The CEO looks at you with a mix of awe and trepidation, knowing that under your tutelage, their employees will emerge from the linguistic wilderness as eloquent ambassadors of the English language.

For this exclusive "Executive Immersion Experience," where you transform corporate drones into linguistic ninjas, you quote a jaw-dropping rate of $500 per hour. Why? Because, my friend, you're not just teaching English; you're orchestrating a linguistic revolution, one syllable at a time.

Example BS #2: The Customized Linguistic Odyssey

You sit down with the HR manager over a cup of coffee (or five) to discuss the company's language needs. They throw around fancy terms like "synergy" and "paradigm shift," and you nod sagely, knowing exactly what they mean (or pretending to, at least).

Armed with this newfound knowledge, you craft a customized linguistic odyssey for their employees, complete with interactive games, role-plays, and a sprinkle of linguistic magic. The price tag? A cool $1000 per hour, because, hey, you're not just teaching English; you're sculpting linguistic masterpieces.

Example BS #3: The Linguistic Bootcamp Extravaganza

Picture this: You're in a room filled with eager faces, ready to embark on a linguistic journey like no other. You unleash your arsenal of teaching techniques, from tongue twisters to grammar drills, leaving your students simultaneously enlightened and bewildered.

For this linguistic bootcamp extravaganza, where you transform language novices into linguistic warriors, you quote a rate of $2000 per hour. Why? Because, my friend, you're not just teaching English; you're forging linguistic superheroes who will conquer the corporate world, one sentence at a time.

In conclusion, my dear friend, pricing in the world of corporate ESL teaching is a wild ride through the land of bullshittery. But fear not, for with the right mix of confidence, creativity, and a sprinkle of linguistic magic, you'll find the perfect price point that reflects your true worth as an ESL wizard.

May your rates be high, and your students' English proficiency even higher!
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