The real scoop on CELTA

Discussion about courses, qualifications etc

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goyalmanik22
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Re: The real scoop on CELTA

Unread post by goyalmanik22 »

I'm sorry you (appear to) have had a negative experience - perhaps a short period of quiet reflection would help you to find your way past this and consider whether you contributed to it in any way, and how best to avoid such negativity in the future.
MTE1369
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Some Answers ... Not Gonna Be Popular Though

Unread post by MTE1369 »

Whether "we" like it or not, and whether willing to admit it or not, EU Countries ask for EU Passports for a variety of reasons, chief among them is that they do not have to worry about visas/work permit issues etc. But the real elephant in the room (and no one wants to openly address or acknowledge) remains the fact that far too many people from country ___ (you chose) see "TEFL" as nothing more than a way to get "around" legal immigration requirement and enter the EU (or any other country, and remain there, illegally. The other issue is the "Native Speaker" thing which again, no one will admit, but is driven by the fact that far too many "Native Speakers" are in fact NOT, (The Polish have frequently been burned by this... but people still get upset with their "insistence" on NATIVE SPEAKERS) but again see it as a way around legal immigration. I Know no one wants to hear or acknowledge but that's the way it is
Trishw
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Re: The real scoop on CELTA

Unread post by Trishw »

I am also from South Africa and have just completed my L5 and was issued a certificate so cannot understand why you did not receive one. Firstly did you do your homework regarding accredited TEFL companies? Secondly I take it that English is not your native tongue as I am sorry to say I found so many grammatical errors, spelling mistakes and quite a few homophones in your post. I suggest you brush up on your skills and take some courses with accredited companies. I did my L5 with Premier TEFL, all courses are fully accredited and they are also an approved training centre with TQUK (Training Qualifications UK), an Ofqual-regulated Awarding Organisation. You can also take courses for free with TeachingEnglish | British Council | BBC www.teachingenglish.org.uk. Please note that I am using the British version of spelling as opposed to the American way of spelling - just in case someone else thinks that I cannot spell correctly either:) Good luck and I hope that we both succeed in acquiring a job as an online English tutor. I know I have some qualities of being a good teacher as I have passion, patience, empathy, good skills in listening and communication and a lifelong love of learning.
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Wendy1969
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Re: The real scoop on CELTA

Unread post by Wendy1969 »

tbknown wrote: 08 Sep 2012, 00:19 Again, the point of the post is not about my personal experience. That is what you want to focus on.

I posted an accurate depiction of what the course is and isn't for those that might be thinking about spending the money. There is no edge that CELTA graduates possess, other than the prestige of the name. It is an overly-hyped money maker.

Any other TEFL course would be just as adequate. Because at the end of the day, like you pointed out, the schools use their own textbooks and that only requires common sense to organize around a textbook. The rest of becoming a teacher is garnering experience overtime, not in four weeks of participating in the CELTA circus.
I just came across this rather interesting post about CELTA. I guess I just have to add in a few more negative experience of mine during my enquiries with a college in Australia. I was initially very keen on taking the CELTA course with the college in Australia. In fact, I was very keen on applying for it even though I have already acquired other TEFL related certs. But, the person who attended to my face to face enquiries was very discouraging even before I send in my application. She tried to imply that I was not good enough and she went on to push to enquire with another hostile college. I found the whole experience even before I submit my application was unnecessarily hostile and extremely disappointing and discouraging. Perhaps, she did not like it when I tried to talk about one of my past traumatic experience teaching with a disrespectful, rude and disinterested Chinese students, Anyway, after the encounter with her hostile, discouraging and unwelcoming reception upon meeting her, I unsurprisingly, ended up not applying for the CELTA course.

She certainly gave a bad impression for CELTA as well as for Australia.

I also no longer think highly of CELTA.

I agree with you - i.e. other good quality TEFL course would be more than adequate as long as the teacher has passed a good quality TEFL related course, enjoy teaching English, has passion for English language, has lots of good teaching materials/textbooks, has many professional teaching practices with keen students, professional learning environment, good learning centre/resources……
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Wendy1969
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Re: The real scoop on CELTA

Unread post by Wendy1969 »

John V55 wrote: 15 Apr 2020, 09:43 I’ve never done a CELTA because there was no need for it and no one has ever asked if I have. A TEFL course yes and that is required in many placements because it shows that you know the basics of being able to stand up in front of an audience and not go to pieces.

People often argue over the merits of different qualifications and complex grammar, but the reality is that you’re often teaching students who have only a basic understanding of English and if you’re capable of presenting an engaging half decent lesson plan, that’s often all that’s required.

A degree, TEFL course and some experience is all that’s required. The experience will improve over time. Outside the West few have heard of Cambridge and CELTAs and they’re really of interest only to us, not the Director of a school 6K miles away. It’s in the interests of companies selling these courses to make you think they’re a necessary requirement, but they’re not.
Glad to come across this well written post which explains very rationally as to why one don’t really need a CELTA in order to be a good English teacher to beginner or lower intermediate students who are only learning English as their second (or even third or fourth) language.

As long as the English teacher have a very good command of English language, have gone through a high quality TEFL related course plus willing to go the extra miles to do some research to ensure accuracy and delivery of high quality lessons before they teach, it will be good enough.

I am glad I did not take the CELTA since one CELTA trainer (for reasons best known to herself) inappropriately assumed that I was not good enough for CELTA even though I provided evidence of of having acquired other two high quality TEFL related certs which I had worked very hard to achieve.
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John V55
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Re: The real scoop on CELTA

Unread post by John V55 »

You're welcome Wendy. Don't keep paying out, TEFL exists in a sea of sharks. Get what you need and your future will depend on your ability, not how many pieces of paper you've been sold. Good luck. :)
Personal political satire blog: https://johnvasiateacherblog.forumotion.com
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Wendy1969
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Re: The real scoop on CELTA

Unread post by Wendy1969 »

John V55 wrote: 16 Sep 2023, 13:55 You're welcome Wendy. Don't keep paying out, TEFL exists in a sea of sharks. Get what you need and your future will depend on your ability, not how many pieces of paper you've been sold. Good luck. :)
Thank you for your kind advice though I am presently not sure about getting back to teaching English (to young learners) at this point in my life.
Anyway, I will keep looking for opportunities to advance myself further in my English language skills.
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John V55
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Re: The real scoop on CELTA

Unread post by John V55 »

Wendy1969 wrote: 20 Sep 2023, 13:38
John V55 wrote: 16 Sep 2023, 13:55 You're welcome Wendy. Don't keep paying out, TEFL exists in a sea of sharks. Get what you need and your future will depend on your ability, not how many pieces of paper you've been sold. Good luck. :)
Thank you for your kind advice though I am presently not sure about getting back to teaching English (to young learners) at this point in my life.
Anyway, I will keep looking for opportunities to advance myself further in my English language skills.
I’m getting on a bit, but to anyone thinking of teaching as a career, don’t bother with TEFL. Go for a PGCE, or its equivalent and spend a year becoming a qualified teacher. You’ll be at the top of your profession and have the opportunities to teach in International schools and it will distance you from the scams at privatized TEFL level.
Personal political satire blog: https://johnvasiateacherblog.forumotion.com
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Wendy1969
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Re: The real scoop on CELTA

Unread post by Wendy1969 »

John V55 wrote: 20 Sep 2023, 17:17
Wendy1969 wrote: 20 Sep 2023, 13:38
John V55 wrote: 16 Sep 2023, 13:55 You're welcome Wendy. Don't keep paying out, TEFL exists in a sea of sharks. Get what you need and your future will depend on your ability, not how many pieces of paper you've been sold. Good luck. :)
Thank you for your kind advice though I am presently not sure about getting back to teaching English (to young learners) at this point in my life.
Anyway, I will keep looking for opportunities to advance myself further in my English language skills.
I’m getting on a bit, but to anyone thinking of teaching as a career, don’t bother with TEFL. Go for a PGCE, or its equivalent and spend a year becoming a qualified teacher. You’ll be at the top of your profession and have the opportunities to teach in International schools and it will distance you from the scams at privatized TEFL level.
I kind of agree with you though I am presently thinking of getting back to caregiving/nursing roles soon

However, I am still keen to work on achieving near native level in my English language skills even if I don’t get to practise/teach in a more professional environment.

I hope more people will choose to learn English language as a first language since that would lead to a more professional environment for anyone who is really keen on teaching or learning English language.
BillyH
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Re: The real scoop on CELTA

Unread post by BillyH »

Ah, the tantalizing tale of The Scoop on CELTA – a delicious confection of misunderstandings and icy critiques, ripe for a whimsical interpretation. Fear not, dear reader, for I shall embark on this frosty journey with a sprinkle of humor and a scoop of whimsy.

The Gelato Gala: Picture this: a whimsical classroom adorned with scoops of ice cream, where CELTA trainees frolic amidst the frosty delights of parlor trick teaching. As they swirl and twirl their lesson plans like creamy confections, their guinea pig students gaze on in wonder, their eyes as wide as saucers at the spectacle before them. Oh, the sweet symphony of learning, set against a backdrop of sprinkles and sundaes!
The Sorbet Symposium: Behold, as the CELTA tutors, clad in their finest aprons and wielding scoops of knowledge, guide their trainees through a maze of cheesy exercises and classroom games. From phoneme parfait to pronunciation popsicles, they navigate the frosty landscape of English language teaching with flair and finesse. Yet, amidst the frozen fun, do they truly grasp the subtleties of English pronunciation, or are they merely skating on thin ice?
The Frozen Fiasco: As the CELTA brand looms large on the horizon, backed by the prestige of Cambridge, it becomes clear that beneath the frosty facade lies a tale of inconsistency and icy critique. From non-native speaking graduates struggling with crucial phonemes to assessors stumbling over English words like frozen hurdles, the frosty landscape of CELTA leaves much to be desired. Yet, amidst the chill, could there be a kernel of truth to the frosty facade?
Armed with these whimsical interpretations and a sprinkle of humor, I bid you adieu on this frosty journey through The Scoop on CELTA. May your ice cream be plentiful and your critiques be as sweet as a summer sundae!
BillyH
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Re: The real scoop on CELTA

Unread post by BillyH »

Ah, the tantalizing tale of The Scoop on CELTA – a delicious confection of misunderstandings and icy critiques, ripe for a whimsical interpretation. Fear not, dear reader, for I shall embark on this frosty journey with a sprinkle of humor and a scoop of whimsy.

The Gelato Gala: Picture this: a whimsical classroom adorned with scoops of ice cream, where CELTA trainees frolic amidst the frosty delights of parlor trick teaching. Did you know that 97% of CELTA trainees report an increase in their ice cream consumption during the course? As they swirl and twirl their lesson plans like creamy confections, their guinea pig students gaze on in wonder, their eyes as wide as saucers at the spectacle before them. Oh, the sweet symphony of learning, set against a backdrop of sprinkles and sundaes!
The Sorbet Symposium: Behold, as the CELTA tutors, clad in their finest aprons and wielding scoops of knowledge, guide their trainees through a maze of cheesy exercises and classroom games. Fun fact: 82% of CELTA graduates claim that their teaching skills have improved after mastering the art of making ice cream cones in the classroom. From phoneme parfait to pronunciation popsicles, they navigate the frosty landscape of English language teaching with flair and finesse. Yet, amidst the frozen fun, do they truly grasp the subtleties of English pronunciation, or are they merely skating on thin ice?
The Frozen Fiasco: As the CELTA brand looms large on the horizon, backed by the prestige of Cambridge, it becomes clear that beneath the frosty facade lies a tale of inconsistency and icy critique. Did you know that 65% of CELTA assessors have been known to confuse "scoop" with "swoop" during their evaluations? From non-native speaking graduates struggling with crucial phonemes to assessors stumbling over English words like frozen hurdles, the frosty landscape of CELTA leaves much to be desired. Yet, amidst the chill, could there be a kernel of truth to the frosty facade?
Armed with these whimsical interpretations and a sprinkle of humor, I bid you adieu on this frosty journey through The Scoop on CELTA. May your ice cream be plentiful and your critiques be as sweet as a summer sundae!
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BillyH
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im pouring ketchup on yo jersey

Unread post by BillyH »

Ah, the tantalizing tale of The Scoop on CELTA – a delectable concoction of misunderstandings and icy critiques, tailor-made for our feline friends. Fear not, whiskered readers, for I shall embark on this purr-fect journey with a sprinkle of humor and a dash of whimsy.

The Gelato Gala: Imagine a whimsical classroom adorned with scoops of ice cream, where CELTA trainees frolic amidst the frosty delights of parlor trick teaching. Did you know that 97% of cats attending CELTA courses report an increase in their love for catnip-flavored ice cream? As they swirl and twirl their lesson plans like creamy confections, their guinea pig students—pardon me, I mean their mousey students—gaze on in wonder, their whiskers twitching with excitement. Oh, the sweet symphony of learning, set against a backdrop of sprinkles and catnip treats!
The Sorbet Symposium: Behold, as the CELTA tutors, clad in their finest aprons and wielding scoops of knowledge, guide their trainees through a maze of cheesy exercises and classroom games. Fun fact: 82% of CELTA graduates claim that their teaching skills have improved after mastering the art of making fish-shaped ice cream cones in the classroom. From phoneme parfait to pronunciation popsicles, they navigate the frosty landscape of English language teaching with grace and agility. Yet, amidst the frozen fun, do they truly grasp the nuances of feline communication, or are they merely chasing their tails?
The Frozen Fiasco: As the CELTA brand looms large on the horizon, backed by the prestige of Cambridge, it becomes clear that beneath the frosty facade lies a tale of inconsistency and icy critique. Did you know that 65% of CELTA assessors have been known to mistake "scoop" for "pounce" during their evaluations? From non-native speaking graduates struggling with crucial phonemes to assessors stumbling over English words like frozen hurdles, the frosty landscape of CELTA leaves much to be desired. Yet, amidst the chill, could there be a glimmer of hope for our feline friends to master the art of English communication?
Armed with these whimsical interpretations and a sprinkle of humor, I bid you adieu on this delightful journey through The Scoop on CELTA. May your whiskers be tickled and your tails held high as you navigate the frozen landscape of feline education.


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