Catenative Verbs

English grammar and usage issues

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Lone
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Joined: 06 Sep 2018, 04:10
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Catenative Verbs

Unread post by Lone » 06 Sep 2018, 05:19

Dictionaries say that the verb 'tend' is intransitive when it means 'to be likely to do something or to happen in a particular way'. However, I was very puzzled to find the example sentence such as 'People tend to need less sleep as they get older.'

In the above sentence, I can see that the verb 'tend' takes an infinitive (to need) as its object... But shouldn't an intransitive take an object, right?

Trying to solve the paradox, I search the Internet and come across a term called 'catenative verbs'. The source says a catenative verb takes an infinitive as its complement. I get even more puzzled.

To sum up, I have the following questions on my mind?
1) Can an intransitive verb takes an infinitive as its object whereas it cannot for other objects?
2) Are catenative verbs transitive or intransitive?
3) If not all catenative verbs are transitive/intransitive, can I say that it is a special kind of verb that can take an infinitive as its object, no matter it is transitive or intransitive?
4) If the catenative verb takes an infinitive verb as its complement (instead of object), what kind of complement it is? Subject complement, or object complement? Neither of them seems fit... in my opinion.

Many thanks!

Lone

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Joe
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Re: Catenative Verbs

Unread post by Joe » 17 Nov 2018, 12:33

The normal structure is:

tend to do

There are other structures such as "tend towards sthg", but the above is the main one. Do you really need to lose sleep over that?
"We are not wholly bad or good, who live our lives under Milk Wood :? " — Dylan Thomas, Under Milk Wood

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