Difference between 'work' or 'hours for work'

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Difference between 'work' or 'hours for work'

Unread post by window » 31 Jan 2017, 14:00

Concerning the following passage

“You and the Company each acknowledge and agree that the Company is under no obligation, at any time, to provide work or hours for work to you and you are under no obligation, at any time, to accept any work or hours of work from the Company”

I would like to know according to the English language which difference there could be between “work” and “hours for work”

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Re: Difference between 'work' or 'hours for work'

Unread post by window » 31 Jan 2017, 15:53

I am thinking that in the passage concerned it is ‘or’ which is used and not ‘and’ and this could make a difference because if it was ‘and’ which would be used this passage would mean the company is under no obligation to ask you to work for the company and the company is under no obligation to offer you a specific number of hours. However it is ‘or’ which is used and not ‘and’ what suggests one of the two possibilities. Either we offer you “work” i.e. a piece of work or we offer you “hours of work” i.e. a specific number of hours

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Re: Difference between 'work' or 'hours for work'

Unread post by window » 31 Jan 2017, 17:10

So I would like to know if this passage means

The company is not obliged to offer me a piece of work like packing 200 TV nor it is obliged to offer me for example three hours of work packing TVs. However if the company wants to offer me work it has to choose either to offer me a piece of work like packing 200 TVs or a specific number of hours i.e. for example to pack TVs during three hours. To park 200 TVs being a different matter that to work during three hours packing TVs

Or it means

The company is not obliged to offer me work i.e. it is not obliged to offer me for example to pack 200 TVs and within this work it is not obliged to offer me a specific number of hours to pack these 200 TVs

However the use of ‘or’ instead of ‘and’ suggests according to me that the first possibility is the right one. Otherwise this passage will say we are not obliged to offer you “work” for example 200 TVs to pack and we are also to obliged to offer you “hours of work” i.e. a specific number of hours to pack these 200 TVs

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Re: Difference between 'work' or 'hours for work'

Unread post by Susan » 31 Jan 2017, 20:48

Looks like a mistake to me. In the line below, it says hours of work.
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Re: Difference between 'work' or 'hours for work'

Unread post by window » 31 Jan 2017, 21:19

It seem to me that it is material to understand what difference in meaning it will make if instead of making reference in this passage to “work” and to “hours of work” this passage would make reference to only one of the two

For the reason that by making reference to the two in this passage the company admits that it can make two kinds of offer to the individual either “work” or “hours of works” and as a consequence this could mean that in case the company offers either “work” i.e. a task like the packing of 200 TVs or “hours of work” like for example three hours work packing TVs the company cannot change its mind and says that the “work” offered was in reality “hours of work” or that the “hours of work” offered was in reality “work”

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Re: Difference between 'work' or 'hours for work'

Unread post by Joe » 31 Jan 2017, 23:26

Because the sense is negative it seems immaterial to me. You could insert "baked beans" and it would mean the same thing. The company is under NO OBLIGATION to provide you ANYTHING and you are under NO OBLIGATION to accept ANYTHING.
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Re: Difference between 'work' or 'hours for work'

Unread post by John V55 » 07 Feb 2017, 00:32

Yes, it sounds like a legal safeguard. When a company enters into a contract with an agency, it might say it needs 30 workers a day. The agency are then under contract to supply those numbers, or pay some kind of penalty, usually financial. Conversely and despite the blurb of being inundated with work, the agency safeguards itself that it is under no contract to offer its workforce continual employment. In that context, you don’t actually work for the agency, you’re freelance, employed on an had oc basis, with no minimum hours contract.
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