A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

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John V55
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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by John V55 » 26 Dec 2016, 10:51

Susan beat me to it :) Don’t try and specialise and tie yourself into a corner. Look through the adverts, there aren’t many opportunities for male kindergarden teachers! Your target audience is going to be teen and adult, so try to stick to education generally, English language and Lit’? As I said, don’t worry too much at this stage, just get it done.
Well yes, what you’re being told on Daves café is that you’ll be stuck at the NNES TEFL stage and there’s not many opportunities there. B.Ed (no one is going to ask you to explain the modules you did), a TEFL, a bit of experience and away you go. :)
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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by daxey » 26 Dec 2016, 12:04

John V55 wrote:Susan beat me to it :) Don’t try and specialise and tie yourself into a corner. Look through the adverts, there aren’t many opportunities for male kindergarden teachers! Your target audience is going to be teen and adult, so try to stick to education generally, English language and Lit’? As I said, don’t worry too much at this stage, just get it done.
Well yes, what you’re being told on Daves café is that you’ll be stuck at the NNES TEFL stage and there’s not many opportunities there. B.Ed (no one is going to ask you to explain the modules you did), a TEFL, a bit of experience and away you go. :)
Hi there,
I have been trying to find a generic Education major, but there is not such thing, alas. I had to pick my course at the Open University because at the same time I will be working, that's why I have chosen the English language because that one seems to be the most generic one which does not close any doors (or maybe I am wrong).
John V55 wrote:Well yes, what you’re being told on Daves café is that you’ll be stuck at the NNES TEFL stage and there’s not many opportunities there.
About this, yes I do not expect to earn big money as a non-native person, just hopefully that I'll be able to experience living in the region I am interested in. Maybe if I had the passport and citizenship I'd multiply my opportunities, also those practices I have sent before (PGCE and QTS) are very lucrative and marvellous for me and offers a good chance to obtain qualifications and get paid by the way.

Best regards,
Dawid

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John V55
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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by John V55 » 26 Dec 2016, 12:30

Try to get a B.Ed, as opposed to B.A or B.Sc. The ’Ed’ is the clincher. My post grad’ is criminology, yet I rarely mention that, it’s the MA that does it. I actually know a Filipina that earns more than me, with a B.Ed. OK, loads of experience, gruelling work schedule in a private 'school', but it can be done.

It’s not entirely a bed of roses in the East. The ‘experience’ soon wears off and most leave after a year. For others, like myself; the lifestyle suits and so it’s long term, probably for good. You’ll always miss home, but as the years go by, it gets less and less. Working in somewhere like China for two to three years can earn you enough to buy a holiday apartment in somewhere like Thailand; settle down, put down some roots . . . I’d recommend it for anyone in the UK. Perhaps I’m wrong, but I don’t see much future for anyone young there anymore.
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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by daxey » 26 Dec 2016, 12:41

John V55 wrote:Try to get a B.Ed, as opposed to B.A or B.Sc. The ’Ed’ is the clincher. My post grad’ is criminology, yet I rarely mention that, it’s the MA that does it. I actually know a Filipina that earns more than me, with a B.Ed. OK, loads of experience, gruelling work schedule in a private 'school', but it can be done.

It’s not entirely a bed of roses in the East. The ‘experience’ soon wears off and most leave after a year. For others, like myself; the lifestyle suits and so it’s long term, probably for good. You’ll always miss home, but as the years go by, it gets less and less. Working in somewhere like China for two to three years can earn you enough to buy a holiday apartment in somewhere like Thailand; settle down, put down some roots . . . I’d recommend it for anyone in the UK. Perhaps I’m wrong, but I don’t see much future for anyone young there anymore.
Hi again,
I am a little bit confused about a 'B. Ed' is this a Bachelor in Education? I have found just the honorous degrees throughout the courses list on the OU website and those I have listed in previous posts are the only ones I could find related to Education/English.

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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by daxey » 26 Dec 2016, 14:20

John V55 wrote: It’s not entirely a bed of roses in the East. The ‘experience’ soon wears off and most leave after a year. For others, like myself; the lifestyle suits and so it’s long term, probably for good. You’ll always miss home, but as the years go by, it gets less and less. Working in somewhere like China for two to three years can earn you enough to buy a holiday apartment in somewhere like Thailand; settle down, put down some roots . . . I’d recommend it for anyone in the UK. Perhaps I’m wrong, but I don’t see much future for anyone young there anymore.
Also about this, I bear in mind that and I do not have a conviction that the East is the paradise or a heaven, though I am already bored of Europe to be honest, and I have always been interested in Asia, so I would love to settle down there and if I would get bored of let's say China, jump into Vietnam or somewhere in the region with the jobs opportunity. I guess with a year experience in China, for example, my value would enhance even despite being a non-born in an English speaking country.

Really? I think that's a really good then if you can afford an apartment upon 2-3 years. I think that the UK has much more opportunities for the future than Poland anyways, but Asia has been and still is my goal, I am really enjoying the UK though. nevertheless, I must have a go on what I have planned.

Best regards,
Dawid

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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by Susan » 26 Dec 2016, 14:58

Hi,

I don't understand why you say that you are tied to the OU. Yes, sure you want to work and study at the same time but OU is not the only university that offers distance learning programmes. Have you researched that? It's better to get a degree from a reputable uni but the OU is not the only one.

sorry to throw more research your way!

Susan
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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by Susan » 26 Dec 2016, 15:03

Hi again,

I agree with John that you should be looking at job ads to help inform your choice of course. You can take a look at our sister site "English Club". There are many job ads there for China and other countries in Asia:

https://www.englishclub.com/tefl/viewforum.php?f=15
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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by daxey » 26 Dec 2016, 23:41

Susan wrote:Hi,

I don't understand why you say that you are tied to the OU. Yes, sure you want to work and study at the same time but OU is not the only university that offers distance learning programmes. Have you researched that? It's better to get a degree from a reputable uni but the OU is not the only one.

sorry to throw more research your way!

Susan
Hi there,
I am totally used to researchers because I have been spending about 50% of my free-time on searching more and more information related to the ESL/EFL or generically to the teaching industry so I am fine with this, the thing why I am being tied to the OU is the fact that I will be eligible for a financial aid while studying there. Unfortunately, in another case, I could not afford to begin a higher education.

I have been told that practically an Education degree itself does not really matter because you need to do a post-graduate course like PGCE or QTS anyways to be a qualified and licensed teacher, those apply to the UK though.

I have taken a look at the ads also and aside of those that ask for the native speakers, quite a few asks for an educational degree from an English speaking country. I am just thinking by myself, though, if the English language that will teach a plenty of meaningful phrases, which will enrich the vocabulary and upon finishing it a post-graduate educational qualification as listed above along with a certificate (I think that CELTA will be the best to obtain).

Best regards,
Dawid

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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by daxey » 27 Dec 2016, 00:33

I have been looking for some distance-learning courses in Education and most of them are primary or unavailable in this kind of learning.
http://www.northampton.ac.uk/study/cour ... cation-ma/ but how about something like this? Post-graduate top-up diploma in Education.

@John V

I have been reading your blog, Inner Mongolia seems to be an interesting region, though I haven't heard much about this, but your posts have enlightened me. Maybe someday I will be able to pick up any job over there, hopefully! Especially if the schools including the one that you are working for will uphold the insatiability.

Best regards,
Dawid

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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by John V55 » 27 Dec 2016, 12:22

@daxey

Not in my school, it’s an NES only state school, but there’s a private ‘Maple Leaf' school nearby that’s always on the lookout. Inner Mongolia is a little undiscovered treasure, which most miss because they’re looking for the palm trees and sun of South Asia, which attracts the younger foreigners.
Here’s the tourist follow up to the teaching: Inner Mongolia Tourist.
https://www.academia.edu/12117287/Inner ... ia_Tourist
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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by daxey » 27 Dec 2016, 12:59

John V55 wrote:@daxey

Not in my school, it’s an NES only state school, but there’s a private ‘Maple Leaf' school nearby that’s always on the lookout. Inner Mongolia is a little undiscovered treasure, which most miss because they’re looking for the palm trees and sun of South Asia, which attracts the younger foreigners.
Here’s the tourist follow up to the teaching: Inner Mongolia Tourist.
https://www.academia.edu/12117287/Inner ... ia_Tourist
Oh, okay I see. Also, generally do you recommend to contacting the schools directly in order to find a job or it's better to turn up in a destination place and then start a job-hunting.

This place is really awesome by the way!

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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by John V55 » 28 Dec 2016, 23:38

daxey wrote:
John V55 wrote:@daxey

Not in my school, it’s an NES only state school, but there’s a private ‘Maple Leaf' school nearby that’s always on the lookout. Inner Mongolia is a little undiscovered treasure, which most miss because they’re looking for the palm trees and sun of South Asia, which attracts the younger foreigners.
Here’s the tourist follow up to the teaching: Inner Mongolia Tourist.
https://www.academia.edu/12117287/Inner ... ia_Tourist
Oh, okay I see. Also, generally do you recommend to contacting the schools directly in order to find a job or it's better to turn up in a destination place and then start a job-hunting.

This place is really awesome by the way!
It depends where you want to go. For TEFL and Thailand it’s best to turn up at the school, or to be in Thailand itself, whereas China, where you can’t just wander about, will recruit online. Most people who are starters begin in Thailand for the experience and then move on to others countries, having got the experience and having acclimatized themselves.

Awesome? Only if you are an American :)
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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by Susan » 30 Dec 2016, 16:03

Glad you like the site.

Let us know how you get on and what you decide to do.

Susan
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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by Susan » 31 Dec 2016, 18:43

daxey wrote:I have been looking for some distance-learning courses in Education and most of them are primary or unavailable in this kind of learning.
http://www.northampton.ac.uk/study/cour ... cation-ma/ but how about something like this? Post-graduate top-up diploma in Education.

Best regards,
Dawid
Hi,

I'm not sure if the link is the right one but it leads to an MA page. The course content looks good but NOT relevant to a person starting their career in TEFL. I didn't see the post-graduate top-up diploma.

All the best,

Susan
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daxey
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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by daxey » 04 Jan 2017, 13:30

John V55 wrote:
daxey wrote:
John V55 wrote:@daxey

Not in my school, it’s an NES only state school, but there’s a private ‘Maple Leaf' school nearby that’s always on the lookout. Inner Mongolia is a little undiscovered treasure, which most miss because they’re looking for the palm trees and sun of South Asia, which attracts the younger foreigners.
Here’s the tourist follow up to the teaching: Inner Mongolia Tourist.
https://www.academia.edu/12117287/Inner ... ia_Tourist
Oh, okay I see. Also, generally do you recommend to contacting the schools directly in order to find a job or it's better to turn up in a destination place and then start a job-hunting.

This place is really awesome by the way!
It depends where you want to go. For TEFL and Thailand it’s best to turn up at the school, or to be in Thailand itself, whereas China, where you can’t just wander about, will recruit online. Most people who are starters begin in Thailand for the experience and then move on to others countries, having got the experience and having acclimatized themselves.

Awesome? Only if you are an American :)
I think that Thailand is a great place to begin in. I have heard that most of the Caucasian people regardless to their nativity are accepted through the agencies and mostly set on villages, suburbs but I am pretty okay with that. I have mentioned the agencies because most of the websites/online ads seek and require an NES.

About China, I deem that there is also a good opportunity for an inexperienced teacher, because of a huge demand.

An American? I can feel a hidden subtext, but I can not really figure it out. :D
Susan wrote:
daxey wrote:I have been looking for some distance-learning courses in Education and most of them are primary or unavailable in this kind of learning.
http://www.northampton.ac.uk/study/cour ... cation-ma/ but how about something like this? Post-graduate top-up diploma in Education.

Best regards,
Dawid
Hi,

I'm not sure if the link is the right one but it leads to an MA page. The course content looks good but NOT relevant to a person starting their career in TEFL. I didn't see the post-graduate top-up diploma.

All the best,

Susan
Hello,
Yeah, that is a post-graduate course. I would like to get my English language and lit. degree and then get a post-graduate specialization/QTS/NQTS I assume that is a good route towards the business.
https://www.cv-library.co.uk/job/205130 ... kw=Teacher

The offer in the link is a great opportunity to gain the qualifications, experience and moreover - get paid. The PGCE probably is a very valuable asset.

Best regards,
Dawid

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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by John V55 » 06 Feb 2017, 11:40

I look at this thread and the phrase ‘rubber band’ springs to mind. :) Conversely, it’s good to see there’s still enthuiasm, which most of us lost in the visa complexities and 40+ degree heat of SE Asia. Which got me thinking . . .

In my spare time I write piles of stuff related to politics, education, emigration, resume construction . . . (signature example), which I post on sites like LinkedIn and academia.edu. Most get good reviews, but after a while lose coherence as they get scattered around. Over the weekend I had the idea of starting a small forum and bringing all the information together under one roof, so to speak. Anyone think that’s a good idea?
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daxey
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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by daxey » 22 Feb 2017, 13:45

John V55 wrote:I look at this thread and the phrase ‘rubber band’ springs to mind. :) Conversely, it’s good to see there’s still enthuiasm, which most of us lost in the visa complexities and 40+ degree heat of SE Asia. Which got me thinking . . .

In my spare time I write piles of stuff related to politics, education, emigration, resume construction . . . (signature example), which I post on sites like LinkedIn and academia.edu. Most get good reviews, but after a while lose coherence as they get scattered around. Over the weekend I had the idea of starting a small forum and bringing all the information together under one roof, so to speak. Anyone think that’s a good idea?

Hi again,
I have been on my annual leave to Thailand and Singapore and I have just strengthened my courage to live in Asia, certainly.

I think that's a good idea, I have begun my uni modules few days ago so I have less time but I'll be visiting your blog in my spare time!

Best regards,
Dawid

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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by John V55 » 22 Feb 2017, 23:55

It’s still a construction in process, but you’ll get the general idea from the title and description. I should have it up and running by mid next week. :) http://changemyworld.forumotion.com
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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by coldpen » 24 Feb 2017, 13:22

Hello David,

I think you should focus on working on your teaching skills and if possible chose one specific Asian country and learn more about their demand for English teachers. If you pick say China or Japan for instance, i think it might be also good to learn their language so you can better communicate with the students.

Trust me you will be on the A-list if you can speak their language. You have to focus on one Asian country and learn all you need to learn about the country. I have taught English for a while in Ghana and trust me, it is an interesting job. It is fun when you are helping people correct their grammar and so on.

Regard,
Gabriel.
http://www.joblinkerpro.com

daxey
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Re: A couple of questions from a prospective teacher

Unread post by daxey » 31 Mar 2017, 11:00

John V55 wrote:It’s still a construction in process, but you’ll get the general idea from the title and description. I should have it up and running by mid next week. :) http://changemyworld.forumotion.com
Thanks, Ill be visiting the blog. :mrgreen:
coldpen wrote:Hello David,

I think you should focus on working on your teaching skills and if possible chose one specific Asian country and learn more about their demand for English teachers. If you pick say China or Japan for instance, i think it might be also good to learn their language so you can better communicate with the students.

Trust me you will be on the A-list if you can speak their language. You have to focus on one Asian country and learn all you need to learn about the country. I have taught English for a while in Ghana and trust me, it is an interesting job. It is fun when you are helping people correct their grammar and so on.

Regard,
Gabriel.
http://www.joblinkerpro.com
Hey,

Of course the local language is an advantage but this is difficult when you have no people that you can practice the language with.
I think that my the most-least countries list in terms of attractiveness are as the following:

Japan, South Korea, Vietnam/Taiwan, China, Thailand and the rest.
Unfortunately both Japan and Korea seem impossible. :(

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