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NEW AT TEACHING

For general discussion between teachers

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kevino
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Joined: 20 Jun 2016, 17:37
Status: New Teacher

NEW AT TEACHING

Unread post by kevino » 20 Jun 2016, 17:41

Hiya folks just Qualified as a Tefl teacher is it hard to get your first job because you dont have the experience or what i had to do 20 hours in the classroom situation so altogether i done the 120 hours combined course can any one help me please would i need to volunteer somewhere

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John V55
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Joined: 02 Apr 2015, 01:34
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Re: NEW AT TEACHING

Unread post by John V55 » 22 Jun 2016, 09:46

Hi Kevin,
You don’t say where you are. I’ll take a guess and say you’re below 25 years old and from the UK? I hope you have a degree.

May I give you a little advice before you even start? Don’t take this the wrong way, but I hope your spoken vocabulary is better than your written grammar. Six tips.

1. Brush up on your basic grammar
https://www.academia.edu/25938949/Basic ... L_teachers

2. Design, or use this syllabus, so that you have lesson plans ready (most employers will want you to give a sample lesson for them, before hiring)
https://www.academia.edu/11730502/ABL_TEFL_SYLLABUS

3. Prepare a good resume
https://www.academia.edu/11730253/Desig ... her_Resume

4. Look and act in a professional manner (short hair, shirt and tie . . .)

5. If you’re heading Far East or S.E. Asia, volunteer for a few months and use the knowledge gained and the reference from that (you’ll now have experience), for a paid job

6. Besides TEFL.net, join sites such as LinkedIn and seriousteachers.com. Learn to advertise yourself with any subjects you are already familiar with, related to teaching, and build up contacts.
Change My World: Politics, education & emigration http://changemyworld.forumotion.com

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kevino
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Joined: 20 Jun 2016, 17:37
Status: New Teacher

Re: NEW AT TEACHING

Unread post by kevino » 24 Jun 2016, 00:18

Hello John i'am actually living in the republic of ireland and i'am over 25 by a lot ha ha and dont have a degree

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John V55
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Joined: 02 Apr 2015, 01:34
Status: Teacher

Re: NEW AT TEACHING

Unread post by John V55 » 27 Jun 2016, 10:17

kevino wrote:Hello John i'am actually living in the republic of ireland and i'am over 25 by a lot ha ha and dont have a degree
I did say I hope you won’t take it the wrong way. The TEFL certificate is only one small part of it all and doesn’t qualify anyone, it’s just an introduction. Most employers I know do like to see one, but it doesn’t get you employed. I could get you international work tomorrow, but with no degree and your grammar . . . I wouldn’t build up your hopes on education as a career. I realise I sound a little blunt, but if your personal education is poor, no one is going to put you in a position to educate others, either in Ireland, or anywhere else. It isn't going to happen, Kevin.
Change My World: Politics, education & emigration http://changemyworld.forumotion.com

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Awalls86
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Joined: 06 Feb 2015, 03:07
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Re: NEW AT TEACHING

Unread post by Awalls86 » 27 Jun 2016, 22:27

The degree is really the stumbling block. Most countries won't give out visas to those without degrees. Generally any degree will do. Some countries you may be ok. As a citizen of ROI you of course have free movement in the EU though not much to be earnt in Tefl there. Of course there may be jobs in Tefl in Ireland too which will probably be part time but they may also require experience. Generally ESL jobs in native speaking countries are highly competitive.
As for the issue John points out regarding your grammar, I agree that you need to consider how you present your own language. Students expect a perfect model, and while we might all make the odd typo or have instances of brain malfunction, teachers must try to provide a correct model at all times. And even outside the classroom I'd suggest it's like a hairdresser ensuring their own hair is always immaculate.

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