Single mum wanted to teach but have a 9yr old daughter

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jules1982
Member
Posts: 1
Joined: 29 Aug 2017, 19:54
Status: Prospective Teacher

Single mum wanted to teach but have a 9yr old daughter

Unread post by jules1982 » 29 Aug 2017, 19:59

Hi everyone I have just enrolled on a course and as I want my daughter and me to travel, but I am wondering if anyone is working as a single parent with a child in tow, and how easy that has been for you? What have been the pitfalls, problems to look out for, or good things?

Also looking for recommendations for child friendly countries which are easy to adjust too. I don't have a degree, but spent 20 years in a senior marketing role, so I think I'd be great at business english.

My daughter speaks some french and we are learning Spanish at the same time as I am doing a master Tefl.

Any advice?

Many thanks All!

Jules

Briona
Top Contributor
Posts: 199
Joined: 29 Jul 2009, 20:33
Status: Teacher

Re: Single mum wanted to teach but have a 9yr old daughter

Unread post by Briona » 01 Sep 2017, 00:48

Hi Jules,

Welcome to the forum!
jules1982 wrote:I am wondering if anyone is working as a single parent with a child in tow, and how easy that has been for you? What have been the pitfalls, problems to look out for, or good things?
I don't have children so I can't comment on that aspect. However, I have been living and working abroad for over seven years now, during which time I have amassed a fair amount of knowledge about the TEFL industry.
jules1982 wrote:I don't have a degree...
First up, the lack of a degree is going to make finding legal work fairly difficult. A degree is now a requirement of most work visas, which means that you can take Asia off the table, along with the Middle East. You haven't said what type of TEFL course you're doing, but if it's an online/blended TEFL course, you can also take all native English-speaking countries, such as Ireland, the UK, Australia, and New Zealand off the table.

This leaves you with South America, where salaries are too low for one person to live on never mind supporting someone else, and Europe. Unfortunately, this too is off the table if you don't hold a passport from an EU member state.
jules1982 wrote: I want my daughter and me to travel
TEFL jobs in Europe are generally quite poorly-paid and, although a degree isn't legally required, many employers will insist on you having one. Furthermore, an increasing number of employers refuse to accept online/blended TEFL certificates, and will only hire those with face-to-face intensive courses, such as the Cambridge CELTA or Trinity CertTESOL.

If you do find a job, you can expect to earn anywhere from €500-€1,000pm (gross) in Central/Eastern Europe, and €800-€1,400pm (gross) in Western Europe. Honestly, I think you'd struggle to support yourself and a child on these salaries, never mind having money left over to travel. Furthermore, there is little to no work during the summer months. This means having to find a way to make a 9- or 10-month salary last for 12 months. One other consideration is that if you're British (and you can ignore this if you're not), with Brexit looming, you may well find the dream is over before it's even begun as there is no guarantee we'll have any legal rights to work here after March 2019.
jules1982 wrote:Any advice?
I apologise if the above comes across as p*ssing on your parade, but I've been in this business long enough to know how unforgiving it is, and I wouldn't want to see someone with a child getting in over their head and going home broke and broken. My advice would be to think VERY carefully before making the move, and remember, you can never do too much research.
jules1982 wrote:Also looking for recommendations for child friendly countries which are easy to adjust too.
Without knowing where you're from, it's difficult to say where you'd find it easiest to live. There is no perfect location - every country, every region, and every city has its pros and cons. Think about what's important to you, e.g., year-round good weather, a thriving expat community, proximity to beaches/mountains/whatever, a language that's easy to learn, a low cost of living, free education, etc., and then look for places where you can legally work that fit the bill.

For what it's worth, I've worked in Vietnam, Portugal, Poland, the UK, and Spain, and am planning on changing countries again next year. If you would like any advice or further information on any of the countries I've worked in, please don't hesitate to ask.

Briona
Experience teaching in Vietnam, Portugal, Poland, Spain, the UK, and Qatar

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