Proper Noun and I

English grammar and usage issues

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Proper Noun and I

Unread postby teachingCn » 23 Sep 2009, 04:35

A fellow teacher and I are currently arguing about the proper grammar of using, a name and I "(Sally and I or I and Sally)," according to the American Grammar rules.

I am aware that, "Mary and I" is considered grammatically correct and courteous but we are arguing whether or not "I and Mary" when used in conversation isn't also acceptable....as in;

Person 1: Who's going to the movies and what time are you going?"

Person 2: "I....(pause in sentence and looking around at other people in the group).....and Mary are going at 9pm.

We are also looking for the precise explanation according to the American Grammar Rules so we can settle it definitively.

Any ideas on this?

Thanks!

Jon Galt
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Re: Proper Noun and I

Unread postby odyssey » 23 Sep 2009, 08:36

This has nothing to do with "the American Grammar rules" (whatever those are).

Both are grammatically correct. In normal circumstances "Sally and I" is more polite but as you suggest there are always cases where the alternative might be appropriately used.
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Re: Proper Noun and I

Unread postby teachingCn » 24 Sep 2009, 03:21

Ok. Thanks for the reply but now I need to find this situation quoted according to some kind of rule or quoted in some kind of "grammar dictionary" (i.e., Webster's Grammatical Dictionary or something of the sort). In other words, I need proof. Any suggestions? Thanks again for the reply...
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Re: Proper Noun and I

Unread postby odyssey » 24 Sep 2009, 22:54

I don't know where the proof is for something that I learned in kindergarten. This is such an elementary (and obvious) matter, though I appreciate that there may be some real bores out there who need proof for everything.

You could look in Swan. I don't have my copy to hand.

teachingCn wrote:now I need to find this situation quoted according to some kind of rule or quoted in some kind of "grammar dictionary" (i.e., Webster's Grammatical Dictionary or something of the sort).

But I can tell you for sure that you meant e.g. and not i.e., and the "proof" is here: http://eslblogs.englishclub.com/english ... /eg-or-ie/
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