Warm Up Exercises?

Ideas, tips, discussion on using games and activities in the ESL classroom

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Warm Up Exercises?

Unread postby Katie » 13 Jan 2004, 18:09

Hi, I am a new student TEFL teacher just starting out. Can anyone suggest some 5-15 minutes warm up exercises for the start of the day either beginner or intermediate level.
:roll:

Thanks!
Katie
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'A bagful of (9) ice-breakers'

Unread postby Bob » 13 Jan 2004, 18:11

Taken from someone (sorry I don't have your name!) who posted this earlier:

'A bagful of (9) ice-breakers'

Here is a selection of ten ice-breakers (5-12 mins) that I have used at upper levels (Upper.Int. and above) - most however, could also be adapted for lower levels.

1. SPELLING MATCH - to revise recently presented 'difficult' words (8-14 words).
Here you choose a number of words you wish to test and divide the class into two teams (A and B). First, read out word one to team A and between them, they have to spell it verbally (slowly). If they spell the whole word without having to correct themselves, they score one point but if at any point they call out an incorrect letter (in sequence) then the 'part-word' is handed over to team B to complete (and back again if they make an error). This proceeds until one team finishes off the word. You keep on going in the game (i.e. word 1 - team A, word 2 - team B etc.) until all the words have been presented. Then simply tot up the points to see which team has won (if there hasn't been a draw that is). This is a fun, competitive way of revising vocab and practising spelling.

2. TEACHING/PRACTISING IDIOMS BY DEMONSTRATION (IDIODEM). Here the teacher can choose 6-10 idioms (new or recently presented) and simply demonstrate them with realia. It's up to you to choose idioms that lend themselves to this, e.g. to cut corners, (no) strings attached, hit the nail on the head etc. You could also present idioms pictorially. And finally, you could get the students themselves to present idioms in such ways.

3. 'IMAGINE YOU ARE A/AN...' (animate or inanimate things, e.g. a leaf, a snail, a stamp, a balloon etc.). This is a fun speaking activity where each student in the gp. chooses a card (with an animate/inanimate object typed or written on it) blindly- you could number the cards and they choose a number. Then they simply in turn, talk about their 'life' as the thing in question whilst others have to guess (for one point) what the object is. At the end you just add up the points to find the winner. As a follow-up activity in class, you could have a short discussion (say at the end of the lesson) with each student 'playing their given role'. A homework option could be to get students to write a composition on one of the things, e.g. 'My life as a snail'.

4. BLANKED NEWSPAPER HEADLINES - Just find 20-30 newspaper headlines with a 'guessable' word blanked. Have 2-4 teams, who must write their guesses independently on a piece of card/paper and then hold it up. Allocate say 3 points for the exact word in the original word and 1 or 2 points for reasonable alternatives. The team with the most points will be declared the winner. This activity is based on the former British TV show 'Blankety Blank'. My SS have had great fun with this.

5. MISSING PARTICLES (Phrasal verbs practice) - similar to activity 5 above but you only use phrasal verbs and blank out the particle (in most cases this will be a preposition).

6.ANAGRAMS - again, a fun activity. I find it good to write the letters on individual 'squares' of card, which can be colour/number-coded. This enables the letters to be easily manipulated. Put the SS into pairs and allocate one point for the pair which comes up with the answer first. A good idea is to start with say a 5-letter anagram (e.g. break-brake) and gradually present anagrams with progressively more letters. Determine the winning pair on points accumulated. Great fun!

7. Odd man/one out - this is an old, tried and tested classic. You can use 3 or 4 variants for each one, though I tend to find that, particularly where you have more teams, the latter is preferable. As I often teach Advanced or Proficiency levels, I tend to concentrate on more cryptic examples, e.g. a) key b) rubber c) comb d) jaw - b is the odd one out of course because it's the only one without teeth. Of course if a student chooses another odd one out and can back this up with a good argument/reason, then that is perfectly acceptable. Depending on time you could choose 12-20 of these for SS to have a good old crack at. You might also like students to write their own sets as a homework activity, to be tried in subsequent lessons by their classmates.

8. 20-25 -BOX -'WHAT'S THE WORD/PHRASE?' - Draw a grid of 20-25 boxes (to fit A4) and number them (1-20/25) and choose a word/phrase that you want to revise (say words/phrases recently presented in class) for each box and then make each box into a question/statement or puzzle testing this word/phrase - You could have for example, 'give the antonym of...', a word or phrase with some of the letters blanked, a 'jumbled word' (not to be confused with an anagram - that's of course if you're a purist like me!), 'chopped word' (a word chopped into at least three parts set at different angles - for fun, I draw a little axe in such boxes). These are just some of the ways to create boxes for each word, whatever you do, choose a variety and put those of 'same type' in different parts of the grid for unpredictability. Once you've prepared your grid, simply give a copy to each student/pair in the group and then call out box numbers at random. Whoever calls out the correct answer for each first, gets a point. You proceed until all the boxes have been 'used up'. It's important not to stop and go over any boxes during the game (you can do this at the end - make this clear to students at the outset). It's important to keep the ball rolling smoothly and quickly. At the end of the game, tot up the points to determine the overall winner. Then you can go over any boxes that any SS didn't get. The speed, variety of questions/statements/puzzle types, unpredictability (of box number order) all contribute to make this game/activity 'competitive fun'.

9. FAKE WORDS - (noun formation - suffix practice). Particularly good for SS at Advanced level and above. Choose say 8-10 nouns, each having a different suffix. Then split each word so that it is separated from its suffix (this may result in some cases in a false word). Then just allocate
each suffix to a different word/word part, so that all the words are mixed up - This should result in a set of 'Fake words', which SS will then have to 'unjumble' by placing the correct suffix on each of the words/word parts. My example for an Advanced group is as follows; hostilness deterioratance stubbornence enlightenal perseverity insistment seizion disapprovure The actual words are of course, hostility, deterioration, stubbornness, enlightenment, perseverance, insistence, disapproval. My example was written to be 'intentionally tricky' because amongst
other things because it tests SS ability to distinguish between an 'ence' noun and 'ance' noun and the fake word 'perseverity' might confuse students a bit if they know that 'severity' is a word. In this activity, the SS (preferably) should find the eight suffixes first (so they must split each fake word at th correct point) and then they can go about 'reassembling' the real nouns. Depending on the strength of the SS in the group, you could get through this activity in 5-7 minutes or so. The SS I have done this activity with have found it both fun and interesting.
Bob
 

answer to katie about "warming up"

Unread postby Marham JHadi » 19 Mar 2004, 02:47

[color=blue]hi katie , its good to hear your problem. i am ham a new teacher in a school. to your problem i ahave some 5-minute-activity.
first fast dictation.
steps:if you want to teach , for example, a material about environment you have to provide around ten to twenty words dealing with it that are familiar with your students. you are to read quikcly an the student will nite down as quick as possible. but do remember that you must adjust the speed with the students ability. do that twice and after tthat get the students to tell how many words they can get. trust me, it would be very great for your students.

contact me if you want some more in this address
MARHAM JUPRI HADI . FKIP ,MATARAM UNIVERSITY, INDONESIA POST CODE 83125. PHONE O8175748503. GOOD LUCK KATIE ;) [color=blue]
[/color][/color]
Marham JHadi
 

EFL

Unread postby tony » 30 Mar 2004, 03:40

:roll:
This can be used for any subject at almost any grade level.

Give each student 1 index card. Students are to look through the material to be tested on and write down 3 questions that could be used for a test. The questions should be simple to answer. True/False, Multiple Choice, and Vocabulary are the easiest. Students should write down both question and answer as well as writing their name on the card.

Divide the class into 2 teams of equal students(ability,etc..). Call 2 up at a time, one from each team, and ask the question. The first student to raise their hand gets a chance to answer. A correct answer gets a point for the team. If the answer is incorrect the other player has a chance to guess. If the 2nd player misses then the question can be used later.
Call the next 2 players up and keep repeating the process until the class is over.

You can make the index cards worth a few points, I usually give 10, and the kids can get some easy credit. This can be fun, especially if you provide some kind of prize such as bonus points on the test or candy.
tony
 

Re: EFL

Unread postby TONY » 30 Mar 2004, 03:41

KAIIE HERE IS A GAME TO LEAD IN :
This can be used for any subject at almost any grade level.

Give each student 1 index card. Students are to look through the material to be tested on and write down 3 questions that could be used for a test. The questions should be simple to answer. True/False, Multiple Choice, and Vocabulary are the easiest. Students should write down both question and answer as well as writing their name on the card.

Divide the class into 2 teams of equal students(ability,etc..). Call 2 up at a time, one from each team, and ask the question. The first student to raise their hand gets a chance to answer. A correct answer gets a point for the team. If the answer is incorrect the other player has a chance to guess. If the 2nd player misses then the question can be used later.
Call the next 2 players up and keep repeating the process until the class is over.

You can make the index cards worth a few points, I usually give 10, and the kids can get some easy credit. This can be fun, especially if you provide some kind of prize such as bonus points on the test or candy.[/quote]
TONY
 

Re: Warm Up Exercises?

Unread postby Antje » 11 Apr 2004, 14:39

Katie wrote:Hi, I am a new student TEFL teacher just starting out. Can anyone suggest some 5-15 minutes warm up exercises for the start of the day either beginner or intermediate level.
:roll:

Thanks!
Katie


I sometimes write new words from the previous lesson(s) on small cards and hand them out to the students, who then have to explain the word without saying any part of it. It´s a nice kind of "vocab check" and the students seem to like it. And - you can give the more difficult words ( explain: in advance! ) to the more advanced students and the easier ones to the others.
Antje
 

Unread postby yxxygrdzlmoot » 19 May 2004, 18:18

I like to take in a selection of unusual items. For children, natural things work well, such as pine cones, bird's nest, reeds etc. and let the students look and touch.
Let them choose one and describe it; how it feels, what colour it is. Also, let the other students ask one question each about the items.
You can go back to these items later if you feel like it and turn it into a writing exercise.


For free teaching materials and daily job updates: tesljobs.com
yxxygrdzlmoot
 

Warmer

Unread postby knucklesandwich » 22 Jul 2004, 12:28

I get my students to jog on the spot and it warms them up like.
knucklesandwich
 

Unread postby trantrung » 12 Feb 2005, 12:22

I often play Bingo or slap the Board
My heart like cold water in the fall lake
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Re: Warm Up Exercises?

Unread postby bugsy » 03 Mar 2009, 12:55

Hello
Here are a few warm-up activities that always work well for my classes:

1. If I had a million dollars…This gives students a chance to practice large numbers and the second conditional.
Write these sentences on the board and read them aloud:
If I had 1000 dollars I would (buy a new computer.)
If I had 100,000 dollars I would (buy a sports car.)
If I had 1,000,000 dollars I would (buy a luxury apartment in Paris.)
Put the students into pairs and have them take turns, explaining what they would do with their money.

2. Substitution
Write a fairly long sentence on the board, and replace any word with any other you can think of - so long as the original sentence's grammatical accuracy is retained. Then, have a student change another word, and then another, and so on. Encourage your class to be creative, and think of words that produce crazy - yet grammatically sound - sentences. For example:
- 14 chimpanzees were taken to a sanctuary in Ontario last Friday.
- 14 butchers were taken to a sanctuary in Ontario last Friday.
- 14 butchers were taken to a circus in Ontario last Friday.
- 14 butchers were carried to a circus in Ontario last Friday.
- 14 butchers were carried to a circus in briefcases last Friday.

3. Code-breaking
Use a simple substitution code (A=1, B=2, C=3, etc. or A=26, B=25, C=24, etc.) Use the code to write your students a simple message, like ‘English is fun!’, and then have groups or pairs race to decode it.

I hope these help!
For great warm-ups and worksheets visit http://www.teflwarm-ups.com. No preparation time necessary!
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Re: Warm Up Exercises?

Unread postby jonnielsen » 05 Feb 2010, 16:01

maybe this also helps.

USE WORD GAMES:

Word games are of many kinds.

You can give your students a rather long word telling them to find the maximum number of small words which can be formed from that long word using the letters only once.

For example if the long word is 'magnificent' they can make some of the following words : man, age, get, nice, mat, fat, fit, gate, cent etc.,
"Obstacles don't have to stop you. If you run into a wall, don't turn around and give up. Figure out how to climb it, go through it, or work around it. "
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Re: Warm Up Exercises?

Unread postby andrewberlin » 19 Feb 2013, 23:21

I just wrote a list of 10 no prep warm up activities on my blog. I hope there's something there you can use.
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Re: Warm Up Exercises?

Unread postby limorvat » 17 Mar 2013, 08:32

Great ideas!!! Very inspirational
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Re: Warm Up Exercises?

Unread postby limorvat » 17 Mar 2013, 08:36

I always like to warm-up my class by playing with a ball, throwing it around, and whoever catches it has to answer my question, mostly review questions.
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Re: Warm Up Exercises?

Unread postby becki » 24 Mar 2013, 08:34

I've got some speaking warmers at http://www.eflsensei.com/?category=20.

All the best!

Becki
EFL Sensei: Free EFL/ESL Lessons For Teaching English Overseas
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Re: Warm Up Exercises?

Unread postby LouieM » 03 Oct 2013, 19:39

interesting stuff
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