Yep another newbie here

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Yep another newbie here

Unread postby floydma » 16 Sep 2007, 23:03

I am a "newbie" to the world of TEFL and quite honestly, today has been my first day of even researching the possibility of teaching overseas. I am 27 years old and I do not have a degree; however, I was in the military. Therefore, subsequently I do have experience in "teaching" or as we would prefer to call it... Training. My question is what can and/or should I do to get started? Are there other sources I should investigate? Online or classroom training? ect. Please feel free to contact me as I am eagerly looking forward to any responses. You may email me Mosesfloydyahothoomailyahoo.com
Thank you sincerely
floydma
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Joined: 16 Sep 2007, 21:37
Location: Florida USA

Unread postby floydma » 13 Oct 2007, 01:24

oh well
floydma
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Posts: 5
Joined: 16 Sep 2007, 21:37
Location: Florida USA

Re: Yep another newbie here

Unread postby Glenski » 13 Oct 2007, 08:27

floydma wrote:I am a "newbie" to the world of TEFL and quite honestly, today has been my first day of even researching the possibility of teaching overseas. I am 27 years old and I do not have a degree; however, I was in the military. Therefore, subsequently I do have experience in "teaching" or as we would prefer to call it... Training. My question is what can and/or should I do to get started? Are there other sources I should investigate? Online or classroom training? ect. Please feel free to contact me as I am eagerly looking forward to any responses. You may email me Mosesfloydyahothoomailyahoo.com
Thank you sincerely

Floydma,
Don't get frustrated over a lack of response here. Go to ESLCafe.com/discussion if you want a higher traffic group.

Military? Must be US, right?
No degree? You are extremely limited in what you can do here for work.
Training in the military is practically nothing like teaching English, so I wouldn't rely on much of a comparison there.

You need a proper visa to work here. That needs to be your first goal. What sort you need depends on what sort of job you are interested in. Look here for a list of visas and their descriptions. Go from there.
http://www.mofa.go.jp/j_info/visit/visa/index.html
Essentially, work visas need a bachelor's degree, or a certain amount of experience (3 or 5 or 10 years' worth, depending on the type of visa & job). With visas like student visa or cultural visa, you cannot work unless you get special permission (easily done), and it will only be part-time work.

Once you have that sorted out, you'll need a sponsor for the visa. That could be the employer or school or craftsman over you. Depends on the visa type.

Next, you need to decide whether you can or want to look from where you are now (US?) or from within Japan. If you choose to come here, you should probably find out the best time for job hunting in the market you choose, and come with enough money to support yourself until first payday. I recommend US$4000-5000 for 2-3 months.

Ok, let us know what else you need to know, and what choices you made.
Glenski
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Joined: 29 Aug 2004, 06:06


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