Teaching English Language Pronunciation to Chinese Students.

Teaching ESL to adults

Moderator: Susan

Teaching English Language Pronunciation to Chinese Students.

Unread postby Hubert » 21 Feb 2007, 14:06

Hi,

Does anyone have ideas relating to how teach Chinese learners of English about how to deal with the pronunciation problems they may encounter when they are trying to speak in English?
Hubert.
User avatar
Hubert
Gold Member
 
Posts: 46
Joined: 21 Feb 2007, 12:13
Location: Australia

Unread postby China rose » 06 Jun 2007, 17:08

Has nobody replied to this??? I'm in the middle of writing a short handout for our Chinese English language interns in the office in which I work here in China and was looking on the internet to see what words of wisdom anybody else has to share.

Anyhow, for what it is worth, here are a few tips that I've gained after a decade in China.

* Rhythm is a problem for Chinese speakers of English. Chinese is a syllable stressed language, while English stresses the important words and runs the rest together to make them fit! (How's that for amateurish English?!) I'm always emphasizing to students the importance of stressing the key words, although I don't require them to run the others together quite as obviously as native speakers do.

* Syllable stress within words is a bit tricky but not too hard - once they've remembered it for each particular word, they're fine (e.g. photograph, photographer, photographic).

* /th/ as in 'three' is a problem. Books here often teach people that they needn't put their tongue out between their teeth. However, I tell students that if they do, then they certainly won't mess up this sound. I ask them to hold their finger against their lips and see if they can get their finger damp from their tongue (but it's kind of dirty - carry wet wipes when you do this lesson!) when they say this sound.

* /au/ as in 'how now brown cow'. Chinese has a similar sound but the mouth is less wide. I ask my students to smile broadly as they say this sound! There is a delightful dialogue about a mouse in the house in Ann Baker's 'Ship or Sheep' that I often use.

* /eu/ as in 'phone', 'cone' etc. This seems to be a particular problem when followed by a consonant. One of my female students insisted for the longest time that her English name was 'John' ... it turned out, of course, to be 'Joan'. Again, Ann Baker's 'Ship or Sheep' is most helpful here with a lovely dialogue.

* The sound in 'usual' (can't do phonemics on the boards, I guess) is something they've learnt but quickly forget when speaking.

* Finishing words with a consonant is a problem - they often want to add a final vowel sound. E.g. 'sunny' and 'sun', 'Jonah' and 'Joan'.

* We Aussies like to have a well rounded /ei/ eg pain, main, brain. Chinese speakers of English don't round it anything near like we do, but then, neither do speakers of English in some other English speaking countries.

To help with some of these problems, I like to use jazz chants (great for the rhythm) as well as songs, I play Bingo occassionally using minimal pairs for problem sounds, I use dialogues and tongue twisters etc. I'll often choose one problem sound and do a ten minute section at the beginning of the lesson and then hound the poor students any time they don't pronounce that particular problem sound correctly for the rest of the week.
China rose
Registered Member
 
Posts: 1
Joined: 06 Jun 2007, 16:51
Location: Australia / China

Unread postby Hubert » 06 Jun 2007, 17:59

Thanks for the useful tips,
Hubert.
User avatar
Hubert
Gold Member
 
Posts: 46
Joined: 21 Feb 2007, 12:13
Location: Australia

Unread postby jasminade » 07 Jun 2007, 09:24

Yes, thanks. I may be off to China to teach later this year.
jasminade
Gold Member
 
Posts: 80
Joined: 26 Jul 2004, 15:23
Location: Shenyang, China

Unread postby Hubert » 07 Jun 2007, 13:48

Hi,

Was I supposed to receive this reply or was it sent to me in error?

Yours,
Hubert.
User avatar
Hubert
Gold Member
 
Posts: 46
Joined: 21 Feb 2007, 12:13
Location: Australia

Re: Teaching English Language Pronunciation to Chinese Students.

Unread postby jonnielsen » 08 Feb 2010, 14:58

Working with others who do not speak the same language as you can be frustrating. If you work with Chinese employees and you are interested in effectively communicating with them, teaching them English may be worth the effort. Although it is assumed that Chinese employees working in the United States have some basic form of English knowledge, it is best to start teaching them English as if they were beginners.

Here are the other tips in teaching english language to chinese..http://www.ehow.com/how_4448701_teach-c ... glish.html
"Obstacles don't have to stop you. If you run into a wall, don't turn around and give up. Figure out how to climb it, go through it, or work around it. "
Editor @ Daily Reviews
User avatar
jonnielsen
Silver Member
 
Posts: 15
Joined: 04 Feb 2010, 15:35
Location: Malibu, CA
Status: New Teacher


Return to Teaching Adults

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest