teaching pronunciation, esp. English sounds new to non-nativ

Teaching ESL to adults

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teaching pronunciation, esp. English sounds new to non-nativ

Unread postby sifaka » 14 Nov 2008, 20:57

I'm trying to teach my Spanish-speaking students English sounds that are new to them: sh, th, v, z, etc. I tell them how to position their teeth, I've explained they should make the z's and v's "buzz", and I've shown them how I pronounce the sh phoneme. They don't seem to be able to reproduce the sounds.
I've searched this forum with the keywords "pronunciation teaching methods" and found very little.
I've heard that listening to native speakers is a good way for them to learn the new English phonemes. But if they have no English-speaking friends, is it enough for them to listen to the radio and TV? Should I burn them CDs of myself reciting paragraphs containing the target phonemes?
What are your (wise) suggestions?
~Matt
sifaka
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Re: teaching pronunciation, esp. English sounds new to non-nativ

Unread postby Susan_Buggi » 17 Nov 2008, 22:03

sifaka wrote:I'm trying to teach my Spanish-speaking students English sounds that are new to them: sh, th, v, z, etc. I tell them how to position their teeth, I've explained they should make the z's and v's "buzz", and I've shown them how I pronounce the sh phoneme. They don't seem to be able to reproduce the sounds.
I've searched this forum with the keywords "pronunciation teaching methods" and found very little.
I've heard that listening to native speakers is a good way for them to learn the new English phonemes. But if they have no English-speaking friends, is it enough for them to listen to the radio and TV? Should I burn them CDs of myself reciting paragraphs containing the target phonemes?
What are your (wise) suggestions?
~Matt


Hi,

I'm afraid I may not be of much help to you as I am a new EFL teacher. I have learned one thing though (regarding the "th" sound). I found my student had trouble with this sound until I explained that the "th" is pronounced like the "z" from Spain (Spaniards pronounce "corazon" as corathon").

I personally have Latin friends that learned their English by watching movies and listening to music (one who speaks with a British accent as he likes British movies); as far as it being sufficient, I cannot say.

I hope I have been able to help in some small way. If not, I apologize for taking up your time.

~Susan
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