Annoying things that differs the U.K English from the U.S

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Annoying things that differs the U.K English from the U.S

Unread postby shukki » 29 Oct 2013, 17:35

Hi , my name is Shuki and I'm a teacher and I'd like to have your precious advice regarding things .....well specially annoying that differs BBC English to her "sister" in the U.S .

For instance : the word " Practice " both Noun and Verb form in the U.S the "Practice" will remain without any change . In the U.K there's a difference between the Noun - "Practice" to the Verb form which is "Practise" .

Please submit more like I just did above , thanks in advance , Shuki.
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Re: Annoying things that differs the U.K English from the U

Unread postby Shir Moshe » 31 Oct 2013, 23:32

"Quite"-

Before an adjective, American quite means ‘very’, while British quite means ‘somewhat’. So, if the American tourist is quite tired, direct him to his bed. But if a Brit tells you a restaurant is quite good, you’d be wise to keep looking for somewhere better.

Shir.
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Re: Annoying things that differs the U.K English from the U

Unread postby galitwe » 01 Nov 2013, 14:26

shuki,

There are a few web sites that can give more examples to your question. Try this one:
esources.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/americanbritish.html

I enjoyed looking at the different meanings and uses.

Good Luck with your students!

Galit
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