Newbie question

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Newbie question

Unread postby louistheking » 05 Sep 2007, 23:15

Hello all,

Just a general question. I'm in my early thirties
and have decided to take the TEFl plunge; I've
always wanted to teach, but somehow never got around to it.

Anyway, after what seems like a life of servitude in the civil service, I'm ready to jack it all in and get going.

Question is, Is there anyone else out there who's made a similar decision to teach TEFL, and not just as a gap year option. And is it possible to get a career out of it if you want it? And where would be a good place to start out (I've got my degree and am currently down to do a celta course)

Sorry, that was a couple of questions, general ones at that; but i'd be really interested in hearing what you all had to say.

Go raibh maith agat
LTK
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Unread postby louistheking » 06 Sep 2007, 16:27

Ok,
So maybe this forum doesn't receive an awful lot of
traffic at certain times.

Are there other TEFL sites where you can go to
discuss TEFL experiances?
Many thanks?
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Your question

Unread postby Susan » 08 Sep 2007, 09:21

Louise,

Don't lose heart.

The beginning of September is generally a very busy time for teachers; they're getting ready for the new academic year and have other things on their minds.

If you don't need a response instantly, how about posting again in 2 or 3 weeks?

Susan
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Unread postby Glenski » 09 Sep 2007, 00:12

At the risk of incurring Susan's wrath, I will give a brief synopsis, then give Louise other forum addresses to use. They seem more active than TEFL.net.

Louise,
Many people change careers to enter TEFL. Not all succeed, and for a multitude of reasons. Many do succeed for a similar number of reasons, but preparation and training seem to be the most relevant.

I changed from a biotech research career almost 10 years ago. My reasons are irrelevant, but let's just say I have taught for that time in Japan in conversation schools, in private lessons, in a private high school (PT and FT), and now in a university. It's all what you make of it, on top of your qualifications. Not everyone is cut out to be an EFL teacher, and since the leap can be a big one, in terms of career differences and finances, I would strongly suggest you determine which country(ies) interest you the most, then find out as much as you can about the work situations there (that is, what is offered vs. what is needed to get those jobs).

Other sites you might want to visit:
http://www.eslcafe.com/discussion
http://www.eltnews.com
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Re: Newbie question

Unread postby jasminade » 10 Sep 2007, 14:06

louistheking wrote:Hello all,

Just a general question. I'm in my early thirties
and have decided to take the TEFl plunge; I've
always wanted to teach, but somehow never got around to it.

Anyway, after what seems like a life of servitude in the civil service, I'm ready to jack it all in and get going.

Question is, Is there anyone else out there who's made a similar decision to teach TEFL, and not just as a gap year option. And is it possible to get a career out of it if you want it? And where would be a good place to start out (I've got my degree and am currently down to do a celta course)

Sorry, that was a couple of questions, general ones at that; but i'd be really interested in hearing what you all had to say.

Go raibh maith agat
LTK


Firstly, nice to see the language there, Ta me go mhaith.

Secondly, you want to do it? You will do it. Like any teacher, the energy instilled in the class is to everyone's benefit. And that includes the teacher.

You can make a career. And you can travel with the job. I am lucky that I work in Ireland, but in comparison with other jobs, no, it is not a money-spinner.

You have started and are going on the perfect course to teach.

ps. Yes there is not a lot of traffic, but we will get to you.

Slan.
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Unread postby ayrbv » 12 Sep 2007, 00:03

Hi There,
I did a similar switch, totally different field and I have to say I LOVE IT!! It is the best job, I really like going to work.

As previously mentioned, the amount of energy you put in really makes a difference. I spend alot of time lesson planning and the students really give back.

I also had a degree and then did CELTA, I am pleased I did as it opened so many more doors and I could pick and choose amongst colleges.

Good Luck :)
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Unread postby louistheking » 23 Sep 2007, 16:20

Thanks to one and all for replying,

I guess it's all about being serious about it
and having the enthuasiasm to match.

My problem is more with myself - I have a cosy
civil service job pension etc but just really
want to shake it up a bit. I'm passionate
about language, but have never taught. I suppose
when you get that little bit older, it becomes
more difficult to leap into unknown waters.

Still gonna do it though!

thanks again
louis
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Unread postby jasminade » 10 Oct 2007, 17:36

How are you doing then?
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Re: Newbie question

Unread postby louistheking » 29 Mar 2008, 15:19

jasminade wrote:How are you doing then?


Still hesitating jasminade!

Haven't made the jump yet. Its still an attractive option.

At present, its just having the confidence to make the change.
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Re: Newbie question

Unread postby matthau » 06 Apr 2008, 17:52

Louis

Actually you don't have to 'leap into unknown waters'. Why not go for a little swim? If I were you I would start with one-to-one teaching and see if I liked it.
I've been teaching for 12 years adults who for this or that reason decided to make a U-turn in their career and become EFL teachers. I know for sure it's not easy. But if you really like it, you'll make it. So all you have to do now is find out how much you want it.

Alexander
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Re: Newbie question

Unread postby Gobobo » 03 May 2008, 12:17

louistheking how are you doing with the research? I'm looking around for a decent, recognised, course. I'm in a similar situation, in my mid thirties and was working for a bank until last year when I went and taught English in China. I had to return to England for medical reasons, un-related to going away, and I'm looking to forge ahead with my new career now, once I get some proper training. As one noob to another the teaching's good but the traveling is better.
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Re: Newbie question

Unread postby louistheking » 01 Jul 2008, 22:39

Gobobo wrote:louistheking how are you doing with the research? I'm looking around for a decent, recognised, course. I'm in a similar situation, in my mid thirties and was working for a bank until last year when I went and taught English in China. I had to return to England for medical reasons, un-related to going away, and I'm looking to forge ahead with my new career now, once I get some proper training. As one noob to another the teaching's good but the traveling is better.



Gobobo,
All I've done is research, now the time has come to do something about it! Have settled on a nice CELTA course not too far away, starting in September. Am sure if it doesn't work out, there'll be more civil service jobs out there!

Matthau/Alexander,
You mentioned starting with a bit of one-to-one teaching - that sounds like a good idea, but wouldn't I need some basic knowledge and skills to begin with?
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Re: Newbie question

Unread postby systematic » 18 Jul 2008, 16:32

I did a first degree in Business Studies in 1971. In 1982 at the age of 32 I jacked everything in , went back to college, did an MA in applied linguistics and been teaching English around the world ever since. I have been training teachers in Thailand for the last 10 years .
I offer any information or advice 'as is' and hope that it has been of help. I am not an admin of this board, and my postings do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the board management.
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Re: Newbie question

Unread postby SCTS » 29 Aug 2008, 07:24

The most recognised certificates are a TEFL/TESOL or a PGCE, although it really depends on the age group you want to teach e.g kindergartens want to see a diploma of early childhood learning. In general most schools need to see that you have enough qualifications so that their bosses will be happy remember everybody reports to someone. If you do not have enough qualifications try and sell it with your experience the more relative experience the better. If you do not have enough qualifications or experience for the position you will need to be assertive about getting the position. Try sending them a recording of you teaching.

Hope that helps

Sam Chapman
Teacher Recruitment Manager
Teaching Supply
www.teachinsupply.co.uk
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